Alternate Dispute Resolution

Alternate Dispute Resolution
Learning teams at the University of Phoenix consist of several students, assigned by the course professor, working together for class projects. The goal of the learning team is to work together to accomplish the set task for any given week. As many know working as team is difficult, but the real clincher in the university setting is that the team members do not have physical contact and rely on each other to email, chat, post to forum, etc. to communicate the assignment and ensure that the assignment is done within the given timeframe. Communication is a proven factor in the success of a team. At times teams do come into a disagreement and steps must be taken to ensure that the conflict will come to a resolution. The clause I suggest for a learning team is simple. The professor should be the unbiased mediator, listens to all sides of the arguments, tries to understand what each party wants from the case and helps set achievable goals. (Superior Court of California, 2010) It is understandable that teams will have different types of disputes in a team, and some can be resolved within the team itself, but it has to be understood that not all arguments can be presented to the professor as that can be time consuming. An ADR can only be presented to the professor if it pretenses a legal issue. One example of using an ADR is if one team member is submitting plagiarized information for a team project and the other team members have confronted the individual and he or she is still insistent in including it in their portion. One if not all team members would have to contact the professor requesting the ADR. The professor, the mediator, would hear all arguments and then make a determination on whether or not the information should be allowed to stay or be removed from the project.

References

Superior Court of California. (2010). Self Service: ADR. Retrieved February 7, 2010, from Superior Court of California County Santa Clara: http://www.scselfservice.org/civ/adr/whattypes.htm