Community Violence and Children

Community Violence and Children

As Carole Goguen wrote in her fact sheet for A National Center for Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, community violence includes predatory violence, which involves a stranger being violent or making threats of violence, and violence arising from non-family interpersonal conflicts. Both of these types of violence include shootings, rapes, stabbings, beatings, and other brutal acts. Because children and adolescents see or become involved in community violence in their own neighborhoods and schools, it is now recognized as a public health issue.
All children and adolescents are at risk of being somehow involved in community violence. As you would think, living in poor, inner-city areas seems to increase the risk for community violence exposure. There are other things that can also put people at a greater risk; for example, gang affiliation and substance abuse, but nothing can guarantee that a child will or will not experience any violence.
Children are not only affected by community violence when they are hurt or threatened, but also when they see it being done to someone else. Our textbook, Exploring Child Development tells us that one-third of children in high crime areas in United States cities witness a homicide, and more than two-thirds

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