Alcoholism

Alcoholism

In the United States, the history of alcohol use has led to the ascendance of the disease theory as the main emphasis of alcoholism. Social-scientific research has consistently conflicted with the disease theory, but psychological conceptions of alcoholism are not very well represented in the public consciousness, in treatment programs, or in policies for affecting this countries drinking practices. Conflict in the field has escalated in the last decade, most notably concerning the issue of controlled drinking in alcoholism treatment. Although our current cultural attitude toward alcoholism in strongly influenced by disease notions, there continues to be a need for psychologists to offer alternative views of alcoholism, considering, there has been no reported improvement in our society?s drinking problems.

Alcoholism or alcohol dependence is a chronic disease marked by a craving for alcohol. People who suffer from this illness are known as alcoholics. They cannot control their drinking even when it becomes the underlying cause of serious harm, including medical disorders, marital difficulties, job loss, or automobile crashes. Medical science has yet to identify the exact cause of alcoholism, but research suggests that genetic, psychological, and social

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